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Shoalhaven Heads is a small village, but it has a full range of excellent facilities including accommodation in the many caravan parks and relocatable home parks plus home stays and homes to rent.

We have a great Bowling & Recreation Club, Golf Club and hotel and the local shops include Post Office, newsagents, two local stores, bakery, butchers, hairdressers, cafe, hardware store, bottle shop, vet and Chinese and wood-fired pizza restaurants.

Lovers of water sports have access to a safe, patrolled surf beach and also boat launching facilities on the Shoalhaven River. Fishing is very popular, both on the river and from the beach. Tall tales are frequently heard – and some can even be believed!

There is a council-run swimming pool close to the beach and Surf Life Saving Club. The pool is set in beautiful grounds. Picnic tables, sun shelters and a shady toddlers pool make this an ideal retreat from the beach to enjoy a refreshing swim.

There are many wineries within a short drive and the ‘Heads is also only 15 minutes from the famous town of Berry where there are a wealth of antique shops, specialty shops and historic buildings.

The flourishing regional town of Nowra is 20 minutes drive south and the popular tourist destination of Kiama is the same distance to the north.

Coolangatta is Shoalhaven’s first settlement and the impressive home and grounds of the region’s first white settler, Alexander Berry, has been restored and is now known as the Coolangatta Estate & Winery. Behind the settlement lies its namesake, the sentinel Coolangatta Mountain. Coolangatta is a Koori native name meaning splendid view.

From 1830, the area was known as Jerry Bailey, although the origin of the name is unknown. It may possibly be the name of a sailor who lost his life when his ship ran aground whilst navigating the shallow river mouth. Whatever the origin, the township’s name was changed in 1955 to Shoalhaven Heads, the original word ‘Shoals Haven’ having been given to the area by explorer George Bass in 1797.